Teaching Your Toddler Verbal Conflict Resolution

While it might not seem logical to try to teach your child how to resolve arguments through words right now, seeing how limited your toddlers’ vocabulary might be, it’s still a good idea to lay down the foundations for open communication, as using words instead of actions is one of the primary tools for defusing and correcting aggression in children.

Eventually, when your child is older, they will be more inclined towards using words to solve disputes, communicate their wants, and express their feelings. Here are some of the steps that you can take to teach your child to turn to words rather than violence.

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Understanding Aggression - External Factors

Sometimes, aggression manifests in toddlers as a result of external factors springing from their environment, conditions imposed upon them, or their caregivers’ behavior rather than due to internal factors. You will need to eliminate or minimize such factors in order to reduce your child’s tendency towards aggression. Here are the most common external factors that contribute to aggressive child behavior.

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Dealing with Aggression

In Understanding Aggression: Internal Factors and Understanding Aggression: External Factors, we covered some of the most common reasons behind aggressive behavior in toddlers. Once you’ve understood the reasons behind your child’s actions, you can take the necessary measures to correct your toddler’s behavior. Read on to learn more about the different tactics that you can employ to deal with and defuse child aggression.

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Dealing with a Spirited Toddler - The Basics

Toddlers are energetic little creatures by nature, but some toddlers tend to be more spirited than others. By definition, a high-energy child is one that is louder, more intense, persistent, empathic, active, and tantrum-prone than the average toddler. While it’s true that spirited toddlers are a challenge to control, there are still several tactics that you can use to defuse daily power struggles and calm your child down.

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Dealing with a Spirited Toddler - Mommy-Toddler Interaction

In Dealing with a Spirited Toddler: The Basics, we covered some of the main tactics that parents of over-energetic toddlers can use to reduce daily power struggles and calm hyperactive children down. In this article, we’re focusing on what policies mommies should implement in order to make life for themselves and their toddlers easier.

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Helping Your Toddlers Face Their Fears

Generally speaking, toddlers outgrow their fears on their own as they mature and become confident little preschoolers. However, in some cases certain toddlerhood fears persist well into adulthood if they’re not addressed properly and conquered. In order to empower your toddlers and help them get over their fears, try the following proven strategies:

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Understanding Your Toddler's Fears

Babies have little to fear because they’re less aware of the world around them. Toddlers, on the other hand, understand that there are forces beyond their control, which - when coupled with their growing imagination and a lack of understanding – oftentimes leaves them feeling anxious and scared. Before you can begin to address your child’s fears, you need to understand why they develop in the first place. Here are some of the main reasons why toddlers develop certain fears:

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Understanding & Dealing with Separation Anxiety

Separation anxiety is when toddlers and babies become upset and throw tantrums at the prospect of being separated from their parents. It is a normal phase that most toddlers begin to experience by their 1st birthday, and though it can be unsettling, it is something that you can help your child get through by being understanding and using a few proven tricks.

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Toddler Defiance & the Word “No”

Don’t worry if your toddler’s vocabulary suddenly seems to be limited to different inflections of one word: “No”. In fact, such behavior means that you’ve got a perfectly normal and healthy kid on your hands! Child research shows that defiant behavior in toddlers is part of healthy development. Read on to learn about why toddlers suddenly grow to love the word and how you can limit their use of it.

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The Throwing Habit

Finding yourself ducking to avoid sippy cups, building blocks and coffee table decoration pieces? Great! Your toddler has officially entered its “throwing” phase! Children between the ages of 18 months and 3 years revel in throwing random objects around; not only is it a great way to develop their motor skills and eye-hand coordination, it’s also a source of great entertainment! Not for the parents, though. Before you start gluing everything into place, however, take a few minutes to learn why it’s healthy for your child to throw things and how you can prevent it from doing any damage in the process.

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Quieting Down a Screaming Toddler

Few things are as mortifying as a toddler starting a screaming session in the middle of a grocery store, or as annoying as a toddler testing the full extent of its vocals at home or in the car, but before you start to lose your temper, take the time to understand why exactly your toddler is behaving the way it is and how you can effectively deal with its screaming.

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Positive Alternatives to Saying No!

Has your toddler started flexing its muscles and asserting its will with a string of “No!”s? Congratulations, you’re the parent of a healthy young child. As your toddler begins to develop its own preferences and character, you can expect to hear it disagreeing with pretty much most things by throwing around its new favorite word. 

As explained in Toddler Defiance & the Word “No”, one reason why toddlers sometimes pick up the word is because they hear their parents use it often around them as a word of power. 

One way to limit your toddler’s use of the word is to limit your own use of it as well and find different ways of expressing yourself. Here are a few positive alternatives that you can use and teach your child in the process:

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Getting Your Toddler to Clean Up

Toddlers are often synonymous with messes, which you’ve probably realized for yourself by now. Most toddlers love spreading their toys across the floor and dumping out the contents of boxes and drawers, and while you might not appreciate the mayhem they can cause in your house, you’re going to have to accept that making a mess is part of a child’s normal development process and helps toddlers better understand how things work. While turning a room upside-down comes naturally to toddlers, cleaning up afterwards doesn’t, but here’s how you can transform your little tornado into your little helper instead:

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